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Aujourd’hui — 25 février 2020Scientific American

Hubble Telescope Test Inspires Changes at NASA to Combat Gender Bias

The space agency’s adoption of dual-anonymous review for certain science programs seeks to ensure proposals are judged on merit alone

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NASA's Hubble Space Telescope launched in 1990 and has been a crucial scientific instrument.

One Reason to Not Leave Radioactive Fluid in Your Pocket

Originally published in August 1901

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Why Should Scientists Mentor Students?

Par : Avi Loeb
Because it's not just good for the students; it's good for us as well

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White Noise Helps Mice Distinguish Similar Tones  

Understanding a surprising effect may eventually improve human hearing

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Thoroughbred Horses Are Increasingly Inbred

Inbreeding in Thoroughbreds has increased significantly in the last 45 years, with the greatest rise in the last 15 or so years.

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Hier — 24 février 2020Scientific American

Lead-Trapping Coating Could Make Cheaper, More Efficient Solar Cell Viable

Pervoskite solar cells can produce more energy than their silicon counterparts, but have risked leaching lead into the environment

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Two laboratory solar cell samples, one (right) with a protective lead-absorbing film applied to the backside.

Katherine Johnson of "Hidden Figures" Fame Dies at 101

The pioneering NASA mathematician overcame racial barriers to help humans reach the moon

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Katherine Johnson, pictured here at NASA's Langley Research Center, where she worked as a computer and mathematician from 1953 to 1986.

NASA's InSight Lander Reveals New Details of Martian Quakes and Magnetism

Par : Mike Wall · SPACE.com
The spacecraft has recorded about 450 ‘Marsquakes’ to date

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This image, the second selfie captured by NASA's InSight Mars lander, is a mosaic of 14 photos taken between March 15 and April 11, 2019.

Fossil-Fuel Subsidies Must End

Despite claims to the contrary, this would have a significant effect in addressing the climate crisis

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Oil rig, Beaufort Sea.

What's Next for Psychology's Embattled Field of Social Priming

A promising field of research on social behaviour struggled after investigators couldn’t repeat key findings. Now researchers are trying to establish what’s worth saving

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Americans Are Perceived as Distant and Cold

Originally published in April 1955

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Map of Antarctica's Bedrock Reveals Vulnerabilities

A new view of the frozen continent could improve predictions for sea-level rise

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The western edge of the famed iceberg A-68 (top right), calved from the Larsen C ice shelf, is seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft, near the coast of the Antarctic Peninsula region, on October 31, 2017, above Antarctica.
À partir d’avant-hierScientific American

How to Report on the COVID-19 Outbreak Responsibly

Remember, the virus doesn’t follow the news and doesn’t care about Twitter

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South Korean health officials spray disinfectant in Daegu on February 21, 2020.

Computation in Service of Poetry

An algorithm calculates powers of 2 from a classical Sanskrit math text

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A portion of <em>Harivamsa,</em> an appendix to the epic poem <em>Mahabharata, </em>written in Sanskrit

Responses to "The Cancer Industry: Hype vs. Reality"

Readers critique a journalist’s critique of cancer medicine

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In Case You Missed It

Top news from around the world

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The Many Meanings of "I Can't"

So much can hide behind those two little words

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Hackers Could Shut Down Satellites--or Turn Them into Weapons

The use of off-the-shelf components means bad actors can easily look for vulnerabilities

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CubeSats fly free after leaving the NanoRacks CubeSat Deployer on the International Space Station on May 17, 2016.

How Deep Is the Deepest Hole in the World?

There’s a portal to the center of the earth in the wreckage of an abandoned project site in Murmansk, Russia. What’s it for? And why is the internet Googling “Kola Superdeep...

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Recommended Books, February 2020



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Plumb and level indicator, circa 1846.

Quantum SETI

Vast data sets and machine learning could link SETI to quantum computing

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Despite a "Double-Barreled" Flu Season, the Vaccine Is Mostly Doing Its Job

This year’s flu shot is working relatively well to prevent influenza, particularly among children

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Methane Emissions from Oil and Gas May Be Significantly Underestimated

Estimates of methane coming from natural sources have been too high, shifting the burden to human activities

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Flames from a flaring pit near a well in the Bakken Oil Field.

Colorado River Is in Danger of a Parched Future

The river is due to lose up to 31 percent of its flow by midcentury—an alarming trend that could affect 40 million people

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Colorado River

Researchers Map Structure of Coronavirus "Spike" Protein

The finding could help lay the groundwork for a vaccine

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Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.

The Art of Animal Adaptation

Species across the globe have been forced to adapt to humans’ effects on the environment. An upcoming book illustrates some unexpected examples of this dynamic

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So Is It Okay to Eat More Red and Processed Meat?

A study last October said so, but the journal’s decision to publish wasn’t necessarily okay

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Young Bats and Snakes Look Identical

Originally published in September 1849

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Medicine as Meditation

What a doctor learned from a chaplain

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Scientists Sculpt Nanoparticle Shells with Light

Hollowed-out microcrystals could lock away carbon 

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